Galton Board

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(New page: [http://physlab.lums.edu.pk/index.php/Classroom_Demonstrations Click here to go back to classroom demonstrations] <h2>Candle in the Wind</h2> <table border="0" cellspacing="10" width="100...)
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[http://physlab.lums.edu.pk/index.php/Classroom_Demonstrations Click here to go back to classroom demonstrations]
[http://physlab.lums.edu.pk/index.php/Classroom_Demonstrations Click here to go back to classroom demonstrations]
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<h2>Candle in the Wind</h2>
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<h2>Galton Board</h2>
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<td valign="top">An electric field can breakdown the insulation properties of air. This creates a mass of oppositely charged ions and electrons that can be pulled towards opposite directions inside the electric field. In this demonstration, we use the plume of a candle flame as the course of plasma. This is a rich structure and would bifurcate into two streams of ions - ionic winds! - moving in opposite directions. The winds can be strong enough to extinguish the flame.
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<td valign="top">Galton’s Board, named after the English psychometrician Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911), is also called a Quincunx or bean machine.  
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Also see: [http://physlab.lums.edu.pk/index.php?title=Demo_Efield Excitation by electric fields]
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Our board is hand made and comprises a funnel at the top which drops a number of balls onto a number of rows of pins followed by a number of containers in which the balls would fall into. Balls would be released from the funnel at the top of the board and have a 50% chance of going either way every time they would hit a pin, and eventually fall into their respective containers. The probability that a ball would end up in an outer container is very small. Thus, we see a tendency for the balls to go towards the center and create what’s called a normal distribution, or bell-shaped curve.  
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[[Image:icon_video.jpg|60px]][[media:Candle_demonstration.wmv|'''Demonstration''']]</td>
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<td>[[Image:Candle_3.jpeg|190px]]     [[Image:Candle_1.jpeg|273px]]  [[Image:Candle_2.jpeg|333px]]   [[Image:Candle_4.jpeg|298px]]</td>
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<td>[[Image:Galton_Board_1.jpeg|205px]]   [[Image:Galton_Board_2.jpeg|207px]]  [[Image:Galton_Board_4.jpeg|341px]]   [[Image:Galton_Board_5.jpeg|195px]]</td>
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Current revision

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Galton Board

Galton’s Board, named after the English psychometrician Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911), is also called a Quincunx or bean machine.

Our board is hand made and comprises a funnel at the top which drops a number of balls onto a number of rows of pins followed by a number of containers in which the balls would fall into. Balls would be released from the funnel at the top of the board and have a 50% chance of going either way every time they would hit a pin, and eventually fall into their respective containers. The probability that a ball would end up in an outer container is very small. Thus, we see a tendency for the balls to go towards the center and create what’s called a normal distribution, or bell-shaped curve.

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